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Cambridge City Council

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How we respond to reports of antisocial behaviour

The police, local authorities and social landlords have a duty to deal with antisocial behaviour. They frequently work together, and with other organisations and agencies, to resolve problems.

We take our duty to tackle antisocial behaviour seriously. We do this both as the city's largest landlord, and as a member of the Cambridge Community Safety Partnership.

Our antisocial behaviour policy and procedures page explains our general approach to antisocial behaviour and how we can tackle it. It explains how we define low, medium and high-level antisocial behaviour.

When we have received and prioritised a report of antisocial behaviour, we will appoint an officer to investigate it further. This officer will normally be your main point of contact until the case is closed.

We try to respond to all high-level reports of antisocial behaviour within one working day. We respond to all other reports as soon as possible, within five working days.

Unless your case is urgent, we might ask you to keep a diary of events for up to four weeks. We will provide you with an incident report form to so this. The lead officer will then review the case again, and take any necessary action. You will be kept informed of all significant developments.

Actions that we can take

We aim to find a fair and lasting solution to your antisocial behaviour problem as quickly as possible. To achieve this, we can:

  • write to the offending party and request an interview
  • gather further evidence such as statements from other affected people, photographs, and medical evidence
  • refer the complaint to another department or agency or the Neighbourhood Resolution Panel scheme
  • present your complaint to the tenancy enforcement panel or the multi-agency antisocial behaviour problem solving group, as appropriate
  • take appropriate enforcement action such as using acceptable behaviour contracts, community protection notices, civil injunctions or (for tenants) demotion orders