Skip To Main Content

Cambridge City Council

Subscribe to email notifications of our service updates and news releases Sign up now

Council invites everyone to sign Cambridge Climate Change Charter to do their bit for a greener city

News release from 07/09/2020

CAMBRIDGE City Council and Cambridge Carbon Footprint are launching the Cambridge Climate Change Charter, and calling on residents and businesses to sign up to reduce their emissions, tackle the climate emergency and help Cambridge become a zero carbon city.

The Cambridge Climate Change Charter is an initiative to help individuals and organisations take practical steps in their everyday lives to help play a part in tackling climate change.

The Charter is hosted on the Cambridge Carbon Footprint website http://cambridgecarbonfootprint.org/charter/ and features a free online carbon footprint calculator that will enable anyone to identify the environmental impact of their everyday lives and activities and then offers a wealth of tips and advice for reducing their emissions.

The aim of the Charter is to provide realistic advice and encouragement to anyone wanting to help tackle climate change. It makes suggestions on different themes for the steps people can take, and explains exactly why these actions are beneficial in tackling climate change, for example:

  • Home energy – the Charter offers advice on switching to renewable energy, improving or installing insulation, heating homes more smartly and other small behaviour changes to reduce energy demand
  • Transport – driving less (walking or cycling instead), joining a car pool or electric car club, working from home more, reducing the amount of flights taken
  • Food – eating less meat and more vegetarian/vegan food, eating seasonally and locally, donating surplus food, considering where food comes from
  • Shopping – buying second-hand or swapping items, using refills, mending and repairing more items, having shopping-free months

The Charter also acknowledges that 49% of Cambridge’s emissions come from businesses and organisations, and so offers guidance and information on how companies can act in more environmentally-friendly ways that fit in with their objectives, including by accessing grants to reduce emissions and make savings on energy bills.

Cllr Rosy Moore, Executive Councillor for Climate Change, Environment and City Centre, said: “It’s going to take a real collective effort by everyone in Cambridge to reduce our emissions, save energy and fight climate change – and the new Cambridge Climate Change Charter will provide Cambridge with a new focus for making crucial steps.

“Nobody can do it all, but if we all identify some changes we could make and pledge to take action, then collectively we can make a real difference to bringing about a cleaner, greener, carbon neutral Cambridge. If you like some of the ideas you see on the Cambridge Climate Change Charter website, why not tell your friends, relatives and colleagues about what actions you’re taking and encourage them to sign the Charter too!”

To mark the launch of the Charter, a special online event is being held this evening, Monday 7 September, at 7pm.

Speakers including Nicola Terry of Transition Cambridge, Richard Hales from Cambridge University Hospitals, Bev Sedley of Cambridge Sustainable Food, Edward Leigh of Smarter Cambridge Transport, Tom Bragg of Cambridge Carbon Footprint and Cllr Rosy Moore from Cambridge City Council will be discussing the new charter and how the online carbon footprint tool can help individuals and businesses reduce their own carbon emissions.

People can register to join the event at www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/launch-cambridge-climate-change-charter-tickets-117648667331?aff=camcityco

Cambridge City Council is working towards Cambridge being net zero carbon. The council’s own carbon emissions from buildings, vehicles and services have fallen by just over 25% since 2014-15. The council will continue to play its role, and is encouraging residents and businesses to join in the efforts to help make Cambridge a net zero carbon city.