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City council successfully prosecutes repeat noise offenders

News release from 09/01/2020

CAMBRIDGE City Council has acted to protect people from antisocial behaviour by prosecuting two residents, after they both failed to comply with noise abatement notices under the Environmental Protection Act 1990.

The council successfully prosecuted Natalie Charlwood at Cambridge Magistrates’ Court for two breaches of a noise abatement notice.

Following complaints and warnings about loud music and loud voices coming from Ms Charlwood’s property, council officers witnessed the noise and a noise abatement notice was served.

Further complaints were received, and officers again witnessed unacceptable noise levels coming from Ms Charlwood’s property on two separate occasions, which caused noise nuisance to the neighbours and breached the terms of the notice.

The officer witnessing the second breach said it was the worst noise disturbance they had dealt with in their 30 years of dealing with noise nuisance.

Due to the seriousness and persistent nature of the offences, the council also obtained a warrant from Cambridge Magistrates and this was executed at Ms Charlwood’s home with police assistance.

Council enforcement officers seized the noisemaking equipment, including a karaoke machine and a subwoofer speaker.

Ms Charlwood of Trevone Place, Cambridge did not attend Cambridge Magistrates’ Court but was found guilty in her absence and fined a total of £190.

In a separate case, another noisy neighbour was found guilty of breaching a noise abatement notice issued by the council, six times in less than four months.

Philip Mistica of Gilbert Close was ordered to pay a fine and costs, and had his noise making equipment forfeited.

He was initially served with a noise abatement notice following numerous complaints about loud music coming from his home. The notice required Mr Mistica to control the volume of the music so that he did not cause further noise nuisance.

However, on six subsequent occasions council officers witnessed breaches of the noise abatement notice so Mr Mistica was then issued with a court summons.

Due to the seriousness and persistent nature of these offences, the council also obtained a warrant from Cambridge Magistrates which was executed at Mr Mistica’s home with police assistance.

Council enforcement officers seized a large amount of noisemaking equipment, including two sets of speakers, three guitars, two televisions and a games console with CD/DVD player.

Mr Mistica failed to appear at his trial at Cambridge Magistrates’ Court, but the magistrates were satisfied that he had breached the noise abatement notice on six occasions in his absence. He was found guilty of the offences.

Mr Mistica was ordered to pay a total of £2,145 and the noise making equipment that had been seized was forfeited.

Cllr Rosy Moore, Executive Councillor for Climate Change, Environment and City Centre, said: “While the council will always try to educate and inform persons causing nuisance, it is sometimes necessary to pursue formal enforcement action.

“This action must be taken to ensure that we don’t allow the situation to cause a lasting detriment, and to show that there are consequences to this type of irresponsible and antisocial behaviour. We are pleased with the outcome of both enforcement cases and hope that the offenders’ neighbours can now enjoy their homes in peace.”

Residents can find out more on noise pollution and report noise complaints at https://www.cambridge.gov.uk or contact Environmental Services by emailing residential.eh@cambridge.gov.uk