New measures proposed to improve city markets

News release from 04/01/2018

CHANGES to operating regulations and to fees and charges at city markets are being proposed by Cambridge City Council.

In a reportto the Environment Scrutiny Committee on 16 January, the council is proposing to update the Charter Market Regulations which govern how the council’s General and Sunday Market operates. The proposed changes are being made following a period of consultation of market traders at the end of last year.

Among the most significant proposed changes are:

  • To help make Cambridge greener, by requiring hot food and drink traders to use non-plastic, recyclable materials for their containers;
  • To decrease the risk of fire and lessen fumes, by requiring hot food traders to use flame retardant sheeting;
  • To encourage traders to turn up to trade and avoid ‘no shows’, by charging casual traders when they confirm they wish to have a pitch, rather than after they have used it.

In addition, the report includes proposed changes to the fees and charges paid by traders on the council’s General and Sunday Market.  To encourage uptake of pitches on the market, charges for standard pitches on both Mondays and Tuesdays are proposed to be reduced from £16.32 to £10 per day to make them more attractive to traders.

It is also proposed that charges for all premium pitches and for standard pitches on the more popular trading days of the week, Wednesday to Sunday, are increased by 2.5%.

In a separate report the council is proposing to make changes to some of the regulations governing traders at the council’s All Saints Gardens Art and Craft Market. Among the most significant proposed changes are:

  • To encourage traders to turn up to trade and avoid ‘no shows’, by charging traders at the point they confirm they wish to trade on a particular day, rather than after they have actually done so;
  • To ensure that traders operate on the market at least one week out of four, so numbers of traders are maintained more consistently throughout the year.

Cllr Rosy Moore, Executive Councillor for Environment and City Centre, said: “Our historic markets play an important role in the life of the city, offering a huge variety of independent goods and services for customers and a vibrant location for small businesses to operate and thrive.

“We are committed to ensuring our markets build on the successes of recent years, including being a finalist in the forthcoming National Market of the Year Awards, and that any changes are fair to all our traders who work so hard and bring so much to the city.

“These proposed changes will help the council to continue its work to improve the popularity of the city’s markets for all those who use them and work there.”

How would you rate your online experience?